must_ask_questions

Must ask questions to ask when hiring an Arborist.

Trees sometimes need to be removed, when they have died, become infected, or have become a danger to things or more importantly people around them.

(Photo Credit: http:/jacobavanzato.com)

It’s best to hire a professional to get your tree removed, but of course you want to best service for a reasonable price. Hiring the right professional needs a lot of consideration and should not be taken lightly.

A qualified tree removal specialist will deliver a safe working process throughout the removal however the unprofessional may cause serious damage to your property and your tree, and as if that wasn’t enough they may not be insured so you may end up being liable for covering the cost of their disaster.

Doing the job yourself is not wise unless you’re qualified to do so. Although for smaller tasks, we have a range of beginner tools on our website: http://www.buxtons.net/machinery

In this guide you’ll find tips and advice on how to choose the the best tree removal specialist for your home and avoid getting yourself scammed.

 

Ask for proof of insurance and proof of liability.

One of the first things you should check when considering a tree removal specialist is their insurance and proof of liability, ensure you’re not going to be liable for any damage, accidents or injuries caused during the removal, both on your own and neighbour’s property.  Without doing these checks, the whole operation could get extremely expensive for you!

 

What credentials do they have?

Ideally you want to hire a professional with a ISA certified arborist or similar qualification. Plus if they will be working close to electrical equipment or power lines then they should also be carrying a ‘Approved Line-Clearance’ certificate. With the appropriate credentials you know that the professional working on your tree is trained to do the job in hand, and so you can be sure they will do a good job.

 

What references do they have?

Any decent company will be more than happy to share a list of satisfied customers. Ask for customers that they have done work for in the past month or so, not stuff from years ago.

 

Ask for a detailed estimate.

It’s important to get written estimates from at least three equal companies to compare prices and understand the scope of the job and where all the costs are coming from.

 

How will they approach the job and what equipment will be used.

You don’t want massive power equipment driving over your lawn and flowerbeds causing collateral damage unnecessarily. If they have to go over your lawn and they do need to used massive equipment then make sure to check their policy is if they damage something. It is also a good idea to point out important and delicate things throughout your garden so they know they to avoid them. Also take time to ask them how they will clean up during and after the job, you don’t want to be left with a mess when they leave.

 

How long will the job take?

This is why getting multiple quotes is important, one company may say three days and another may say three hours. Use your best judgment to assess which is reasonable. If you are finding it hard to assess if a quote is out then ask how the time will be spent.

 

Do they appear professional?

What does their vehicle look like, is it well taken care of? Is it clean and in good shape? If they don’t take care of their equipment, do you think they will take care of your tree and property? Do they have a website? Design and content can give you a sense of their professionalism, as can the appearance of the vehicles they use on jobs. That can give you an idea of how they run their business.

 

Are they going to be wearing PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)?

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) requires that PPE is worn for any tree care operation. A reputable tree service will require their workers to be protected.

Tags: , , ,
Previous Post
Cezary_Romanowski
Arboriculture Just for Fun

Arborist Spotlight – Cezary Romanowski

Next Post
57c9377b170000012ac7728b
Arboriculture

Make a difference for “that tree”